Run Sheet for Monday, November 4th


LISTEN LIVE AT 1:00 PM ET

Respond and Engage!
TALK TO PAUL ON-AIR: 313.272.5600


TODAY’S GUEST: Judith Shulevitz, Author of The Sabbath World: Glimpses of a Different Order of Time

Judith Shulevitz

THE ATLANTIC: Why You Never See Your Friends Anymore

NYT: How Unpredictable Work Hours Turn Families Upside Down


A Theology of the Sabbath: John Owen on Hebrews 4:9-10 and the New Covenant Sabbath as a Sign of Christ’s Finished Work


Run Sheet for Friday, November 1st


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Respond and Engage!
TALK TO PAUL ON-AIR: 313.272.5600


“The President has put an actual heretic in charge of faith outreach.” — Erick Erickson

NYT: Paula White, Trump’s Personal Pastor, Joins the White House

“Her role will be to advise the administration’s Faith and Opportunity Initiative, which Mr. Trump established last year by executive order and which aims to give religious groups more of a voice in government programs devoted to issues like defending religious liberty and fighting poverty.”

Doug Mills/The New York Times

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Meet the Minnie Church | PHOTO CREDIT: Christianity Today

CT: Meet the Minnie Church

What happens when you plant a church only for Walt Disney World employees?

Walt Disney World has almost 70,000 employees—a population about the size of Canton, Ohio. It’s the largest single-site employer in the country. At 40 square miles, it’s about as big as Miami or San Francisco. So Cast Member Church is fishing in a massive lake.

Cast Member Church is truly a church for Disney Cast Members. It’s not a church to attend on vacation. It’s not a church for Disney fans in Central Florida. It’s a church for a certain kind of employee from one company.

At a church leaders’ meeting at the Disney Springs Starbucks, Barr is sketching out his evangelistic methodology (literally sketching it: He carries a yellow legal pad and is constantly drawing diagrams to illustrate his points.). He talks about getting people to understand that they are a “child of the king, which means we are princes and princesses. We should glory in that identity.” He talks about Disneyland artist Charles Boyer’s famous riff on Norman Rockwell self-portrait, where Mickey Mouse looks into the mirror and sees Walt Disney. “Mickey sees his creator in the mirror: God’s desire is that when people look at you, they see him.” Don’t debate people if they’re skeptical, he says. “If they say, ‘I don’t believe that,’ just respond, ‘That’s okay, just imagine with me for a minute that it’s true.’ Disney [Cast Members] love imagination.” One of the biggest challenges in people understanding the gospel, Barr says, is the challenge in many Disney movies: the absence of a loving father.

Cast Member Church meets in a rented hotel space the first Friday of each a month for its “praise and wonder,” where it makes sure it hits those “irreducible marks of a church” Schreiber mentioned: communion, baptisms, a period of extended worship, a sermon based on Scripture. But more frequently, the church gathers in small groups at Starbucks or Disney lodges at 10 p.m., after shifts end. The church calls these “CommuniDs”—the “D” stands for “discipleship,” Barr tells me with a wink. 

[O]ne of the only times Barr has had to exercise church discipline—one of those “irreducible marks of a church”—was over syncretism. A CommuniD, he says, ended up becoming just a Star Wars fan club. (Disney purchased the Star Wars franchise in 2012 and opened a Star Wars-themed section at Disney World in August.) “They stopped talking about the lessons and just started talking about similarities between Jedi religion and Christianity and stuff like that,” he says. After trying to get the group back on track a few times, he gave them an ultimatum. “Guys, this is about becoming disciples of Jesus, not about becoming Jedis.” The leader, he said, responded that he’d rather talk about Star Wars. “I said they’d have to stop being part of our church to do that. So they left and started down … a thing,” he says, cautiously. “It just fell apart.” He pauses. “I’m accountable for that. I’m the one leading in a context where the Disney influence is always turned up to 11. I’m trying to help [Cast Members] learn to turn down the noise. It’s the same way you learn to hear the Father’s voice.”


Run Sheet for Wednesday, October 30th


LISTEN LIVE AT 1:00 PM ET

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TALK TO PAUL ON-AIR: 313.272.5600


Dr. Tony Evans and Lois Evans

CP: Tony Evans says chemo no longer an option for wife, Lois; prays for supernatural intervention   


BOOK RECOMMENDATION: The Madness of Crowds: Gender, Race, and Identity

In his devastating new book The Madness of Crowds, Douglas Murray examines the twenty-first century’s most divisive issues: sexuality, gender, technology and race. He reveals the astonishing new culture wars playing out in our workplaces, universities, schools and homes in the names of social justice, identity politics and intersectionality.

We are living through a postmodern era in which the grand narratives of religion and political ideology have collapsed. In their place have emerged a crusading desire to right perceived wrongs and a weaponization of identity, both accelerated by the new forms of social and news media. Narrow sets of interests now dominate the agenda as society becomes more and more tribal–and, as Murray shows, the casualties are mounting.

Readers of all political persuasions cannot afford to ignore Murray’s masterfully argued and fiercely provocative book, in which he seeks to inject some sense into the discussion around this generation’s most complicated issues. He ends with an impassioned call for free speech, shared common values and sanity in an age of mass hysteria.

NATIONAL REVIEW: Douglas Murray’s The Madness of Crowds Offers Sanity and Hope

NATIONAL REVIEW: An Interview with Douglas Murray: Gender, Race, and Identity


Whatever Happened to the Sunday Evening Service?

Alistair Begg

Meet the Minnie Church | PHOTO CREDIT: Christianity Today

CT: Meet the Minnie Church

What happens when you plant a church only for Walt Disney World employees?

Walt Disney World has almost 70,000 employees—a population about the size of Canton, Ohio. It’s the largest single-site employer in the country. At 40 square miles, it’s about as big as Miami or San Francisco. So Cast Member Church is fishing in a massive lake.

Cast Member Church is truly a church for Disney Cast Members. It’s not a church to attend on vacation. It’s not a church for Disney fans in Central Florida. It’s a church for a certain kind of employee from one company.

At a church leaders’ meeting at the Disney Springs Starbucks, Barr is sketching out his evangelistic methodology (literally sketching it: He carries a yellow legal pad and is constantly drawing diagrams to illustrate his points.). He talks about getting people to understand that they are a “child of the king, which means we are princes and princesses. We should glory in that identity.” He talks about Disneyland artist Charles Boyer’s famous riff on Norman Rockwell self-portrait, where Mickey Mouse looks into the mirror and sees Walt Disney. “Mickey sees his creator in the mirror: God’s desire is that when people look at you, they see him.” Don’t debate people if they’re skeptical, he says. “If they say, ‘I don’t believe that,’ just respond, ‘That’s okay, just imagine with me for a minute that it’s true.’ Disney [Cast Members] love imagination.” One of the biggest challenges in people understanding the gospel, Barr says, is the challenge in many Disney movies: the absence of a loving father.

Cast Member Church meets in a rented hotel space the first Friday of each a month for its “praise and wonder,” where it makes sure it hits those “irreducible marks of a church” Schreiber mentioned: communion, baptisms, a period of extended worship, a sermon based on Scripture. But more frequently, the church gathers in small groups at Starbucks or Disney lodges at 10 p.m., after shifts end. The church calls these “CommuniDs”—the “D” stands for “discipleship,” Barr tells me with a wink. 

[O]ne of the only times Barr has had to exercise church discipline—one of those “irreducible marks of a church”—was over syncretism. A CommuniD, he says, ended up becoming just a Star Wars fan club. (Disney purchased the Star Wars franchise in 2012 and opened a Star Wars-themed section at Disney World in August.) “They stopped talking about the lessons and just started talking about similarities between Jedi religion and Christianity and stuff like that,” he says. After trying to get the group back on track a few times, he gave them an ultimatum. “Guys, this is about becoming disciples of Jesus, not about becoming Jedis.” The leader, he said, responded that he’d rather talk about Star Wars. “I said they’d have to stop being part of our church to do that. So they left and started down … a thing,” he says, cautiously. “It just fell apart.” He pauses. “I’m accountable for that. I’m the one leading in a context where the Disney influence is always turned up to 11. I’m trying to help [Cast Members] learn to turn down the noise. It’s the same way you learn to hear the Father’s voice.”


Run Sheet for Monday, October 28th


LISTEN LIVE AT 1:00 PM ET

Respond and Engage!
TALK TO PAUL ON-AIR: 313.272.5600


Max Lucado, other prominent Evangelicals, blast John MacArthur for his biblical position on women preachers

CP: Max Lucado responds to John MacArthur’s women preacher comments: ‘Bride of Christ is sighing’

CT: A Message to John MacArthur: The Bible Calls Both Men and Women to ‘Go Home’


WP: Why millennials are skipping church and not going back

But then again, so what? Will it matter for anyone other than the Sunday ushers whose collection baskets have suddenly gotten lighter?

Yes, actually. Religious and other civic organizations will atrophy — and not just from lack of funds. Faith and practice can’t persevere through our generation without attendance, and neither can the hope they tend to bring. And while that may not seem like a problem now, it will soon. We still want relationships and transcendence, to be part of something bigger than ourselves. Our drive for those things isn’t likely to wane, despite how ambivalent we might feel about ancient liturgies or interminable coffee hours or even pastors whose politics have taken a sharp turn MAGA-wards.


NICHOLAS KRISTOF: We’re Less and Less a Christian Nation, and I Blame Some Blowhards


President George W. Bush and Ellen DeGeneres share the Owner’s Box at a Dallas Cowboy’s game. Insanity ensues from “tolerant” liberals.

NATIONAL REVIEW: Not Enemies, But Friends

An excellent response to the critics of Ellen DeGeneres for her friendship with George W. Bush


CT: The Cautionary Tale of Jerry Falwell Jr.

“Whether at Christian universities, evangelical nonprofits, or local churches, we’ve fallen head over heels for the entrepreneurial leader. We talk the talk of servant leadership but walk the walk of “Gentile rulers” who “lord it over” others (Mk. 10:42). We’re infatuated with men and women who can grow influence and finances. We want “movers and shakers” who can “make a difference.” We hire not for humility and service, but for boldness, innovation, and creativity. Big is beautiful.”


NPR: Forgotten: The Things We Lost In Kanye’s Gospel Year

In 2019, Kanye West rose from the ashes of a career flameout by taking his faith on tour. But engaging with his self-styled salvation means forgetting what gospel music was created to do.


Run Sheet for Friday, October 18


LISTEN LIVE AT 1:00 PM ET

Respond and Engage!
TALK TO PAUL ON-AIR: 313.272.5600


Michigan Reformation Conference

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Paul will be speaking at the 16th Annual Michigan Reformation Conference in Flint, Michigan on Saturday, October 26th (10am – 4pm). More information and free registration.


GUEST: Dr. Thomas Kidd

Dr. Thomas Kidd

Thomas S. Kidd is the Vardaman Distinguished Professor of History at Baylor University and the author of many books, including Who Is an Evangelical? A History of a Movement in Crisis (Yale, 2019); Benjamin Franklin: The Religious Life of a Founding Father (Yale, 2017); Baptists in America: A History with Barry Hankins (Oxford, 2015); George Whitefield: America’s Spiritual Founding Father (Yale, 2014); and Patrick Henry: First Among Patriots (Basic, 2011). 

Who is An Evangelical: The History of a Movement in Crisis

If you follow politics, you’ve seen plenty of headlines or social media posts in recent months along the lines of “Evangelicals believe [a certain stance on an issue]” or “Evangelicals support [this or that candidate]”.

And if you follow Dr. Thomas Kidd on Twitter, you’ve seen him repeatedly call out such posts — in particular, questioning how such stories determine who counts as an evangelical before reaching their conclusions.

Now, Kidd — a Baylor history professor since 2002 — has published his thinking in a new book: Who Is an Evangelical?: The History of a Movement in Crisis. In it, Kidd pulls from his expertise in American religious history to look back at the birth and growth of the evangelical movement, in the process illustrating how distorted the word “evangelical” has become when it comes to politics.

THOMAS KIDD: Will Donald Trump Ever Lose His Evangelical Firewall?

NYT: Why Evangelicals Support Donald Trump

JULIE ROYS: Leading Evangelicals Endorse Prosperity Preacher Paula White’s New Book

JAMES K. A. SMITH: Trump’s evangelical advisers are promoting Paula White, but here’s the book they should really read

RNS: National Association of Evangelicals names new president, diverse leadership


GUEST: R. R. Reno, Editor of First Things

R. R. Reno

R. R. Reno is the editor of First Things magazine, and author of the just released Return of the Strong Gods: Nationalism, Populism, and the Future of the West. He was formerly a professor of theology and ethics at Creighton University. He is the author of several books including Fighting the Noonday Devil, a theological commentary on the Book of Genesis in the Brazos Theological Commentary on the Bible series. His work ranges widely in systematic and moral theology, as well as in controverted questions of biblical interpretation.

Return of the Strong Gods: Nationalism, Populism, and the Future of the West

After the staggering slaughter of back-to-back world wars, the West embraced the ideal of the “open society.” The promise: By liberating ourselves from the old attachments to nation, clan, and religion that had fueled centuries of violence, we could build a prosperous world without borders, freed from dogmas and managed by experts.

But the populism and nationalism that are upending politics in America and Europe are a sign that after three generations, the postwar consensus is breaking down. With compelling insight, R. R. Reno argues that we are witnessing the return of the “strong gods”—the powerful loyalties that bind men to their homeland and to one another.

Reacting to the calamitous first half of the twentieth century, our political, cultural, and financial elites promoted open borders, open markets, and open minds. But this never-ending project of openness has hardened into a set of anti-dogmatic dogmas which destroy the social solidarity rooted in family, faith, and nation. While they worry about the return of fascism, our societies are dissolving.

But man will not tolerate social dissolution indefinitely. He longs to be part of a “we”—the fruit of shared loves—which gives his life meaning. The strong gods will return, Reno warns, in one form or another. Our task is to attend to those that, appealing to our reason as well as our hearts, inspire the best of our traditions. Otherwise, we shall invite the darker gods whose return our open society was intended to forestall.

THE CATHOLIC THING: Review of Return of the Strong Gods