A Tale of Two Semis

Which of these two trucks do you suppose was cited for violating the city of Gouverneur, New York’s billboard ordinace? They are both parked on property adjacent to city roads. One has a religious message; the other advertises a drug company. One truck owner was cited, the other wasn’t.

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7 Replies to “A Tale of Two Semis”

  1. John 15:20
    Remember the word that I said unto you, The servant is not greater than his lord. If they have persecuted me, they will also persecute you; if they have kept my saying, they will keep yours also

  2. I think it was because the “blue” trailer was facing the opposite direction! *; )

  3. One has the company logo on it, like any box might. The other is obviously an attempt to bypass ordinances on billboards. Furthermore, getting cited was probably the goal of these people any way, so that they can get attention. Is this the best argument you can make that Christians are being persecuted in the U.S.?

  4. Why is one of the semis “an attempt to bypass ordinances on billboards” and the other not?

    It isn’t an argument for the persecution of Christians. It’s an illustration of a double standard. BOTH are clearly in violation of billboard ordinances. ONE was clearly singled out because of its MESSAGE.

  5. Its “that name”! Always has been, always will.
    That at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth;

    There is a name I love to hear….
    “Jesus, Jesus, Jesus, sweetest name I know!”
    Fills my ever longing,
    Keeps me singing as I go!!!!!!!!!!

  6. Paul,

    If you were saying the anti-billboard ordinance was an unfair limitation on free speech, I might agree with you, but the issue is whether or not there is a double standard.

    The logo on the side of the drug company trailer is no different than you might see on any piece of heavy equipment out there. The logo, not including the stripe, takes up perhaps 1/20th of the surface; there was not even a slogan, and you can barely read the word “drugs” from a distance. In fact, if I paid for a billboard and this was what I got, and there was no slogan, I’d want my money back.

    Meanwhile, the Jesus trailer used every inch of space to convey a precise advertisement. The intent of the ad is the same as the intent someone has when they purchase space on a billboard. If the owner had just put a small picture, or even a smaller message, he probably would have gotten away with it.

    I just don’t see a double standard. And I’d feel the same way if the truck was advertising something I believed in.

  7. Paul,

    If you were saying the anti-billboard ordinance was an unfair limitation on free speech, I might agree with you, but the issue is whether or not there is a double standard.

    The logo on the side of the drug company trailer is no different than you might see on any piece of heavy equipment out there. The logo, not including the stripe, takes up perhaps 1/20th of the surface; there was not even a slogan, and you can barely read the word “drugs” from a distance. In fact, if I paid for a billboard and this was what I got, and there was no slogan, I’d want my money back.

    Meanwhile, the Jesus trailer used every inch of space to convey a precise advertisement. The intent of the ad is the same as the intent someone has when they purchase space on a billboard. If the owner had just put a small picture, or even a smaller message, he probably would have gotten away with it.

    I just don’t see a double standard. And I’d feel the same way if the truck was advertising something I believed in.

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